my spiritual and religious beliefs

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my spiritual and religious beliefs

Post by redpill on Sun Feb 04, 2018 11:18 pm



Reach out with your feelings. What do you see?

I see life, death and decay, that feeds new life, warmth, cold, peace, violence,

and between it all

balance, energy a force

and inside you

inside me, that same force

and this is the lesson

..the balance is so much bigger




sadly i can't lift boulders or force choke bad guys and bullies, or build a lightsaber
but the one real world religion that comes closes to these ideas is taoism and Zen




it's only an idea. i don't believe if some kid is dying of cancer like DIGP i can somehow use the Tao to cure them sadly.

as a kid i went to catholic school and an evangelical church and i read the bible. i also saw star wars and kung fu and bruce lee movies.

i couldn't help but notice that Obi Wan and Yoda were saying was far more interesting than what the bible was saying.

the material presented in star wars and kung fu was more interesting than the bible and Shakespeare.

when i listen to obi wan yoda and now luke and rey talk about the force, i definitely feel something. i don't have any super powers but i feel something. affraid

i'm not lifting rocks but something inside me has always been there, and now it's awake and i don't know what it is or what to do with it.

listening to luke explain that the force is the tension that binds the universe together, i get high without drugs bounce

its too bad being mystical doesn't confer actual super powers, teaching a religion similar to what Luke is teaching Rey in star wars last jedi could probably make the world a better place

i think the tao te ching is a better read than the bible, esp the book of joshua or leviticus Sleep

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Re: my spiritual and religious beliefs

Post by TracyB on Mon Feb 05, 2018 5:16 am

At some point I believe they're gonna find out the bible is a work of fiction....the Harry Potter of its time. Same with other religions.

Most religion seems to revolve around controlling populations and the fear of death.

Civilization is nothing but controlled chaos. People being born, people dying, people fucking, people fighting, wars, disease, it just goes on and on and on...

no end in sight...until you reach your end....then it goes on for everyone else until their end.

Do I believe in a higher power of some sort? Yes. I don't think we can comprehend it though.

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Re: my spiritual and religious beliefs

Post by redpill on Mon Feb 05, 2018 10:45 am

TracyB wrote:At some point I believe they're gonna find out the bible is a work of fiction....the Harry Potter of its time. Same with other religions.

Most religion seems to revolve around controlling populations and the fear of death.

Civilization is nothing but controlled chaos. People being born, people dying, people fucking, people fighting, wars, disease, it just goes on and on and on...

no end in sight...until you reach your end....then it goes on for everyone else until their end.

Do I believe in a higher power of some sort? Yes. I don't think we can comprehend it though.

as a Notherner we are taught that the South, including Virginia is part of the bible belt. i take it you've not been exposed to Christians?

re: bible,

as a kid i aw Charles Heston 10 commandments and learned about Moses and Pharah. it was an epic story. did Exodus actually happen? i have since learned



Mainstream history and archaeology now consider the Exodus never to have happened, and the story to be an entirely fictional narrative put together between the 8th and 5th centuries BCE.[1] Christian and Jewish literalists do not accept this.


Despite being regarded in Judaism as the primary factual historical narrative of the origin of the religion, culture and ethnicity, Exodus is now accepted by scholars as having been compiled in the 8th–7th centuries BCE from stories dating possibly as far back as the 13th century BCE, with further polishing in the 6th–5th centuries BCE, as a theological and political manifesto to unite the Israelites in the then‐current battle for territory against Egypt.[3]

Archaeologists from the 19th century onward were actually surprised not to find any evidence whatsoever for the events of Exodus. By the 1970s, archaeologists had largely given up regarding the Bible as any use at all as a field guide.

The archaeological evidence of local Canaanite, rather than Egyptian, origins of the kingdoms of Judah and Israel is "overwhelming," and leaves "no room for an Exodus from Egypt or a 40‐year pilgrimage through the Sinai wilderness."[4] The culture of the earliest Israelite settlements is Canaanite, their cult objects are of the Canaanite god El, the pottery is in the local Canaanite tradition, and the alphabet is early Canaanite. Almost the sole marker distinguishing Israelite villages from Canaanite sites is an absence of pig bones.

It is considered possible that those Canaanites who started regarding themselves as the Israelites were joined or led by a small group of Semites from Egypt, possibly carrying stories that made it into Exodus. As the tribe expanded, they may have begun to clash with neighbors, perhaps sparking the tales of conflict in Joshua and Judges.

William Dever, an archaeologist normally associated with the more conservative end of Syro-Palestinian archaeology, has labeled the question of the historicity of Exodus “dead.” Israeli archaeologist Ze'ev Herzog provides the current consensus view on the historicity of the Exodus;[5]
“”The Israelites never were in Egypt. They never came from abroad. This whole chain is broken. It is not a historical one. It is a later legendary reconstruction — made in the seventh century [BCE] — of a history that never happened.

Professor of Ancient History and Archaeology Eric H. ClineWikipedia's W.svg also summarizes the scholarly consensus in his book Biblical Archaeology: A Very Short Introduction (published by Oxford University Press and winner of the 2011 Biblical Archaeology Society's "Best Popular Book on Archaeology");[6]

Despite attempts by a number of biblical archaeologists — and an even larger number of amateur enthusiasts — over the years, credible direct archaeological evidence for the Exodus has yet to be found.

While it can be argued that such evidence would be difficult to find, since nomads generally do not leave behind permanent installations, archaeologists have discovered and excavated nomadic emplacements from other periods in the Sinai desert.
So if there were archaeological remains to be found from the Exodus, one would have expected them to be found by now. And yet, thus far there is no trace of the biblical "600,000 men on foot, besides children" plus "a mixed crowd...and live stock in great numbers" (Exod. 12:37-38) who wandered for forty years in the desert.

The issues
Egyptian record keeping

Archeological digs dispute Exodus
Map of sites discussed in this article
See the main article on this topic: Old Testament § Evidence for the Old Testament

The Book of Numbers gives a list of sites at which the Hebrews allegedly settled, in Sinai and its immediate surroundings, during the Exodus. Of these sites, a select few can be pinpointed relatively well by description and deduction. Two such sites are the Biblical Kadesh Barnea, modern Ein Qadis, and Ezion Geber, on the Israeli side of the border between Israel and Jordan, just outside Eilat. Both sites have been investigated archaeologically, and found to have been founded during the Ancient Near Eastern Late Iron Age — no earlier than 700/800 BCE,[17] with the obvious exception of early neolithic/nomadic activity.

No sign of plagues in Egypt
For a description of the duress Egypt was allegedly under, see: Book of Exodus#The Ten Plagues

All of the dates put forward by advocates of the historicity of Exodus fail to correspond to any period of national chaos or collapse in Egypt, as would clearly be expected by such a series of disasters.

Ussher's 1491 BCE date corresponds with a time of ambitious Egyptian expansion. The reign of Hatshepsut was stable, peaceful and saw extensive construction projects and trading missions; this is known from actual material remains as well as Egyptian records. Her successor, Thutmose III, took Egypt to its greatest imperial extent, forging an empire from the Euphrates to the 4th and possibly the 5th cataract. These are not the signs of a nation that, just a few years before, had lost its entire harvest, its drinkable water, its army and its sons. There is no archaeological evidence at all of mass death and impoverishment in the early New Kingdom period.

https://rationalwiki.org/wiki/Evidence_for_the_Exodus

Historicity
Summary

The consensus of modern scholars is that the Bible does not give an accurate account of the origins of Israel.[26] There is no indication that the Israelites ever lived in Ancient Egypt, the Sinai Peninsula shows almost no sign of any occupation for the entire 2nd millennium BCE, and even Kadesh-Barnea, where the Israelites are said to have spent 38 years, was uninhabited prior to the establishment of the Israelite monarchy.[27] Such elements as could be fitted into the 2nd millennium could equally belong to the 1st, and are consistent with a 1st millennium BCE writer trying to set an old story in Egypt.[28] So while a few scholars, notably Kenneth Kitchen and James K. Hoffmeier, continue to discuss the historicity, or at least plausibility, of the story, arguing that the Egyptian records have been lost or suppressed or that the fleeing Israelites left no archaeological trace or that the large numbers are mistranslated, the majority have abandoned the investigation as "a fruitless pursuit".[29][30]

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/The_Exodus#Historicity

plus yahweh didn't intervene during the Holocaust, when his chosen people the jews were the target

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