when menstruation goes amuck

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when menstruation goes amuck

Post by redpill on Wed Jun 13, 2018 12:25 pm

i click on my news feed and i find this

'Why my daughter wants a hysterectomy at 15'
By Natasha Lipman and Kirstie Brewer
BBC Stories
13 June 2018

Elizabeth* struggled with suicidal thoughts from the day she got her period. She finally got relief after a hysterectomy at 42. She and her daughter Grace*, 15, have the same severe form of premenstrual syndrome. Here, they explain why they are desperate for a treatment to save Grace from a lifetime of hormonal hell.

At 15, Grace has resolved never to have children and is resentful that her mum didn't do the same.

Both of them have a severe form of premenstrual syndrome (PMS) which fuels outbursts of anxiety, rage, psychosis and debilitating physical pain.

"My mum has given me something that I now have to deal with for the next 40 years," says the teenager. She wants to be the third generation in her family to have a hysterectomy. Not in her 30s or 40s like her mother and grandmother, but now.

Grace's anxiety has got worse since her periods began and she often feels "sad, angry and exhausted".

School is a struggle. She is trying to plough on for now, but she can't wait to finish.

"At school I can't concentrate in the build-up to my period, and when I'm in a rage I feel like nobody understands me. Nobody else seems to be going through it. I feel so isolated," she says.

She becomes desperate for her period to start - even though it's something she dreads.

"It's a bit like putting a pin in a balloon - I need to burst," she says. "But when I actually get it, I can barely function."

Grace's periods can last most of the month and have been so heavy that she can't get through a whole lesson without needing to change her sanitary pad.

"I would be drenched through eight layers of clothing, and 20 minutes later it was all back through again," she adds.

But worse than the bleeding is the profound feeling of shame and humiliation that snakes in after she has lost control and had a violent outburst.

"I feel like I have let myself down, I get tearful and so embarrassed, almost traumatised," she says.

Her GP's solution was to encourage Grace to go on the contraceptive pill when she was 13. But when she was put on a pill with a high dose of synthetic progesterone, she became violent overnight.

"It made life really awful for everyone," says Grace.

When her brother - then five - witnessed her screaming and shouting and saw her hit their mum, he shut himself away in the larder.

"I hope he doesn't remember that time, when things went very badly wrong with Grace," says Elizabeth. "She was scary, very scary."

She recalls what happened when the family were all having lunch together and Grace was asked to move up a seat. "That sent her off into orbit, over absolutely nothing," says Elizabeth. Things quickly escalated and Grace smashed up the bathroom.

This was not the daughter she knew - she describes Grace as very sweet and eccentric, like a girl from the pages of an Enid Blyton novel.

The pill was pumping her full of progesterone - Elizabeth says they are both hyper-sensitive to this, but it never occurred to the GP to look at the adverse effects of certain hormones in any depth.

Grace was referred to a psychiatrist who put her on anti-psychotic medication. The intention was to subdue her rage and "get the family through Christmas" according to Elizabeth.

Things got so bad that the day after Boxing Day, Elizabeth met the psychiatrist to talk about putting her daughter into residential care.

"Not because she wasn't loved and cared for, but to keep everyone safe," she explains.

But she always felt that her daughter's problems were linked to her menstrual cycle and when she heard about premenstrual dysphoric disorder (PMDD), by chance on the radio, she realised that Grace's symptoms ticked all the boxes, as did her own.

for futher reading https://www.bbc.com/news/stories-44439735

kinda sort of reminds me of that shower scene in the movie Carrie

i wonder how women with this condition got by in say the middle ages or the cave man days

in game of thrones first season that queen asks a young girl if she started bleeding. i'm not a huge GOT fan


She becomes desperate for her period to start - even though it's something she dreads.

"It's a bit like putting a pin in a balloon - I need to burst," she says. "But when I actually get it, I can barely function."

Grace's periods can last most of the month and have been so heavy that she can't get through a whole lesson without needing to change her sanitary pad.

"I would be drenched through eight layers of clothing, and 20 minutes later it was all back through again," she adds.

But worse than the bleeding is the profound feeling of shame and humiliation that snakes in after she has lost control and had a violent outburst.

that sounds like a lot of blood. i'm not sure i could still live if i lost that much blood

there's a saying never trust anyone who bleeds for 7 days and doesn't die.

and i read this bbc article i was feeling a deja vu like jess in the triangle or neo in the matrix.

deja vu.

this story sounds familiar

i've heard this story before
oh yeah now i remember

TracyB wrote:
btw do u use tampons?

No. I did as a teen for awhile but my period wasn't heavy so I just stuck with pads.

I had a friend once who seriously loathed menstruation. Not even the common complaints. She was a hypocondriac and also hated the site of blood, her own blood even more so. It would give her panic attacks. I felt sorry for her. Hopefully she went to a psychologist to deal with that because there's nothing she can do to stop it and there's no sense in freaking out every month over it.

sounds like tracyb wasn't exagerating. pale

sometimes i wonder if life itself is a trip on the Aeolus

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