why forumsforjustice.org claims "justice for jonbenet" is total bullshit lynch mob

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why forumsforjustice.org claims "justice for jonbenet" is total bullshit lynch mob

Post by redpill on Mon Mar 16, 2015 6:45 pm

here they claim

http://www.forumsforjustice.org/forums/forumdisplay.php?6-Justice-for-JonBenet-Discussion-Public-Forum


Forum: Justice for JonBenet Discussion - Public Forum

A Forum Devoted to Discussion Regarding the JonBenet Ramsey Case

the moderators cynic and tricia griffith to ever single member is 100% rdi. so they dismiss dna evidence as no evidence of intruder and 100% focused on RDI.

what is justice? a dictionary definition

noun
noun: justice; plural noun: justices

   1.
   just behavior or treatment.
   "a concern for justice, peace, and genuine respect for people"
   synonyms: fairness, justness, fair play, fair-mindedness, equity, evenhandedness, impartiality, objectivity, neutrality, disinterestedness, honesty, righteousness, morals, morality
   "I appealed to his sense of justice"
of interest to us " fair play, fair-mindedness, equity, evenhandedness, impartiality, objectivity, neutrality, disinterestedness, honesty, righteousness, morals, morality"

meriam dictionary gives us another definition

http://www.merriam-webster.com/dictionary/justice

Full Definition of JUSTICE
1
a :  the maintenance or administration of what is just especially by the impartial adjustment of conflicting claims or the assignment of merited rewards or punishments
b :  judge
c :  the administration of law; especially :  the establishment or determination of rights according to the rules of law or equity
2
a :  the quality of being just, impartial, or fair
b (1) :  the principle or ideal of just dealing or right action (2) :  conformity to this principle or ideal :  righteousness
c :  the quality of conforming to law
3
:  conformity to truth, fact, or reason :  correctness


based on these definitions of justice, forumsforjustice.org is total bullshit. forumsforjustice.org contradicts the definition of justice.

justice does not mean, the Ramseys did it, and any evidence to the contrary is to be dismissed.

forumsforjustice.org is in fact a lynch mob.

yes  a lynch mob. there is of course DNA in 3 different locations on 2 different articles of clothing.

per Mark Beckner


• On possible sources of unidentified DNA on JonBenet's clothing: "Manufacturing process is one. Interactions with other people is another. Intentional placement is another. Belongs to an intruder is another. Yes, you can often tell where DNA comes from. In this case, it is small enough that it is difficult to tell. CBI thought it was either sweat or saliva."

• "The suspect is the donator of that unknown DNA, and until you can prove otherwise, I think that's the way you've got to look at it."

based on the definition of justice, forumsforjustice.org has a moral obligiation to do this


• "The suspect is the donator of that unknown DNA, and until you can prove otherwise, I think that's the way you've got to look at it.

the fanatic imposter Cherokee is fond of claiming "forensic linguistics" even though she's never actually studied either forensic handwriting nor forensics linguistics. then claim it has solved the case by showing Patsy wrote the ransom note. fanatics.

in my earlier life i once debated cynic on this issue. his response was "battle of the experts" hahahaha!

ever single member of  forumsforjustice.org is an RDI fanatic, and their claim of justice is simply to lynch the Ramseys.
which of course is the definition of a lynch mob.

this is a concrete description of justice as it applies to a crime investigation

Maintain an attitude of professionalism and integrity.
Conduct all research in a generally accepted scientific manner.
Assign appropriate credit for the ideas of others that are used.
Treat all information (not in the public domain) from a client or agency in a confidential manner, unless specific permission to disseminate information is obtained.
Maintain an attitude of independence and impartiality in order to ensure an unbiased analysis and interpretation of the evidence.
Strive to avoid preconceived ideas or biases regarding potential suspects or offenders from influencing a final profile or crime analysis when appropriate.
Render opinions and conclusions strictly in accordance with the evidence in the case.
Not exaggerate, embellish, or otherwise misrepresent qualifications when testifying, or at any other time, in any form.
Testify in an honest, straightforward manner and refuse to extend their opinion beyond their field of competence, phrasing testimony in a manner intended to avoid misinterpretation of their opinion.
Not use a profile or crime analysis (the inference of Offender or Crime Scene Characteristics) for the purposes of suggesting the guilt or innocence of a particular individual for a particular crime.
Make efforts to inform the court of the nature and implications of pertinent evidence if reasonably assured that this information will not be disclosed in court.

forumsforjustice.org are in egregious violation of


Maintain an attitude of professionalism and integrity.
Conduct all research in a generally accepted scientific manner.
Render opinions and conclusions strictly in accordance with the evidence in the case.


forumsforjustice.org with tricia cynic koldkase cherokee et al, being some of the worse offenders,

justice for jonbenet would be "a :  the quality of being just, impartial, or fair"

now they found a complete DNA profile AND multiple types of trace evidence in the form of fibers animal hair unsourced tape an cord and unidentified shoe print. handwriting not a match for either parent. linguistics also eliminates both parents as author of RN.

if we look at another case in Colorado that was also solved with tDNA

http://unsolvedmysteries.wikia.com/wiki/Alie_Berrelez




Alie Berrelez

Real Name: Alesandra Berrelez
Nicknames: Alie
Location: Englewood, Colorado
Date: May 23, 1993
CaseEdit

Details: On May 18, 1993, Alie Berrelez was playing with her brother in front of her home in the Englewood suburb of Denver when she vanished after her babysitter went inside. Police believed that Alie had been abducted and a bloodhound named Yogi traced her scent out of town to a ravine near Deer Creek Mountain Park where Alie’s body was found stuffed into a khaki duffel bag and tossed off a 20-foot embankment.
Suspects: None known, but the bloodhound tracked the killer’s scent back to an empty apartment back at Allie’s apartment building. Nicholas Stofer was questioned as a suspect, but he was eventually cleared. Police believe that the killer either lived in the apartment complex or the killer had visited someone who lived in the complex.
Extra Notes: This case was featured as part of the remarkble tracking abilities of bloodhounds: the airdate is November 10, 1995.
Thie case was also featured on Vanished with Beth Holloway.
Nicholas stofer alie berellez

Nicholas Stofer

Results: Solved. Investigators taking a new look at the unsolved 1993 kidnapping and murder of 5-year-old Alie Berrelez matched a DNA sample to neighbor Nick Stofer, ending a saga for the little girl's family. As advancements in technology emerged, evidence gathered in the case has been re-submitted for additional testing and comparison, police said. On Feb. 8, 2011, several items of evidence were submitted to the CBI for new DNA testing. A CBI agent developed a complete DNA profile from an area of Alie’s underwear and from the waistband of her underwear. That DNA profile matched the DNA profile of Stofer. "We had to wait 18 years for forensic science to catch up to the evidence we had on hand," said Englewood police Chief John Collins, announcing the end to the Berrelez case on Tuesday. "It was unequivocally his DNA in her underwear and it had no business being there." At the time of the abduction, Stofer lived in the Englewood apartment complex where Alie lived with her mother and two brothers. He had been there for three weeks prior to the abduction and abruptly moved to California just five days after Alie’s abduction and murder. He made the reservations for his flight on the morning of May 18, the day Alie disappeared. Nicholas Randolph Stofer was a focus of the investigtion within days when her 3 year old brother told the police "the old man" took her and then took them to Nick Stopher's apartment and said that was where "the old man" lived. Detectives traveled to Redlands, Calif. to take blood and hair samples from Stofer. However, DNA testing did not exist at that time. Detectives learned during the investigation that as a teenager Stofer frequently partied in Deer Creek Canyon. A friend who helped Stofer move into the Englewood apartment where he lived said that Stofer had in his possession a green military style canvas bag similar to the one Alie was found in. Stofer denied ever having such a bag. Stofer was a welder, and police said they found metal shavings in the duffel bag in which Alie's body was found. Stofer had also once expressed a fantasy about abducting a small girl, police said. Carpet fiber found on Alie’s blouse matched the carpet in Stofer's apartment and did not match any other carpet in the apartment complex, police said. Over the years, the investigation into Alie’s abduction and murder continued. Stofer remained a person of interest and a suspect but police could not arrest him because there wasn't enough evidence. On Oct 7, 2001, Stofer was found dead inside his Phoenix apartment of an apparent drug overdose. Police were called to Stofer's home on a welfare check after his family had not heard from him in some time. When Stofer's body was discovered, he had been dead for two days.


Allie Berelez had tDNA  tDNA found on her waist band of her panties.  


As advancements in technology emerged, evidence gathered in the case has been re-submitted for additional testing and comparison, police said. On Feb. 8, 2011, several items of evidence were submitted to the CBI for new DNA testing. A CBI agent developed a complete DNA profile from an area of Alie’s underwear and from the waistband of her underwear.

this matched Stofer, and the CBI states the case solved. Stofer is the killer.

But if we were to apply forumsforjustice.org excuses to Allie Berelez, then there is no "solution". the DNA is "secondarily transferred" or "came from a factory worker sneeze". such excuses would be an injustice for Allie Berelez and it is an injustice for Jonbenet.

Not a single thread on forumsforjustice on possible intruder theories that left that DNA. truly lynch mob.

there is no reason to discount tDNA for Allie Berelez, and there is no reason to discount the DNA found on Jonbenet.

and in addition to tDNA was multiple types of trace evidence in the form of fibers unidentified animal hairs, all unsourced to anything in the house.

forumsforjustice.org is their an objective scientific reason to accept tDNA results on Allie's panties as proving Stofer is her killer, but rejecting tDNA found on 3 different locations in 2 separate articles of clothing on Jonbenet, + multiple unsourced fiber and hair and shoeprint evidence, unsourced cord and tape and shoeprint?

notice the language for Allie Berelize

As advancements in technology emerged, evidence gathered in the case has been re-submitted for additional testing and comparison, police said. On Feb. 8, 2011, several items of evidence were submitted to the CBI for new DNA testing. A CBI agent developed a complete DNA profile from an area of Alie’s underwear and from the waistband of her underwear. That DNA profile matched the DNA profile of Stofer. "We had to wait 18 years for forensic science to catch up to the evidence we had on hand," said Englewood police Chief John Collins, announcing the end to the Berrelez case on Tuesday. "It was unequivocally his DNA in her underwear and it had no business being there."

the scientists who work for CBI concluded Allie Berelize tDNA found on her panties, not semen, just skin, was Stofers, and same for Jonbenet.



• "The suspect is the donator of that unknown DNA, and until you can prove otherwise, I think that's the way you've got to look at it.

forumsforjustice.org has never proven otherwise. yet they continue to lynch the Ramseys.

when Mary Lacy said there is no innocent explanation for the tDNA it is highly likely CBI came to that conclusion and wrote a scientific report to this effect.

when tDNA was found on Allie Berelez underwear, before it was identified as Stofer's DNA, what scientific conclusion would you draw?

if hypothetically speaking the tDNA found on Allie Berelez did NOT match Stofer, what scientific conclusion would you draw?

if hypothetically speaking the tDNA found on Allie Berelez  not only matched Stofer, but also matched the tDNA found on Jonbenet panties and longjohns, what scientific conclusion would you draw?

forumsforjustice is found of claiming Occam's Razor. What is the simplest explanation not only of the tDNA but also multiple forms of unsourced fiber hair tape cord ligature?

there are other  cases solved with tDNA

http://www.whio.com//news/news/local/touch-dna-solving-crime/nWPcD/


Even if prints are not available, criminals who touch doors, windows and other objects leave behind microscopic bits of skin that carry identifying information known as "touch DNA." Lt. Christopher Clark of the Clark County Sheriff's Office said traditional DNA relies on blood or saliva from a suspect. Touch DNA  has changed the way investigators approach crime scenes looking for evidence.

"Stolen vehicles, car break-ins. We do not just look for blood and bodily fluids anymore," Clark said.
The power of Touch DNA to unlock cases first made headlines in Ohio in July of 2009. It helped to solve a gruesome double-murder investigation in Akron.  Alan Grna and his mother, Julianna, were found beaten to death in their home.  Stacy Violi, Forensic Scientist at the Ohio Bureau of Criminal Investigation, said an alert investigator on the scene theorized that the killer may have washed blood from his hands in an upstairs bathroom and then used a roll of toilet paper to dry them. Violi said Touch DNA from a suspect was found inside the toilet paper tube, placing him at the scene of the crime. Since that case, the use of Touch DNA has spread to more cities. DeWine predicts it will help solve a local cold case that has remained a mystery for years.

"There will be a case in the Miami Valley in the not too distant future that we will solve because of touch DNA," DeWine said. - See more at: http://www.whio.com//news/news/local/touch-dna-solving-crime/nWPcD/#sthash.TGajUKF6.dpuf

Cold Case Murder of Krystal Beslanowitch, 1995 : Solved through forensic technologies.

A determined cop who was the original investigator into the murder of Krystal Beslanowitch 18 years ago in Utah helped bring resolution to this case. As The Huffington Post reports, Sheriff Todd Bonner just couldn’t let the case go. Beslanowitch was 17 years old when she died from a crushing blow to the skull. A prostitute, her body was found in 1995 along the Provo River.  Leads at the time only led to dead-ends, but investigators finally got somewhere in 2013, when new forensic technologies, taking a full day, were used to extract touch DNA from the granite rock that crushed her skull. In fact, a tool called a forensic vacuum allowed for the DNA extraction. The DNA matched to a Joseph Michael Simpson, who had been a resort bus driver in the area at the time. Simpson, now 46, was arrested in Florida in September of this year.
http://www.forensicscolleges.com/blog/resources/10-cold-cases-solved

http://www.abcactionnews.com/news/region-pinellas/st-petersburg-police-report-that-touch-dna-has-helped-solve-38-percent-of-burglary-cases

PINELLAS COUNTY, Fla - New technology is helping police and prosecutors in the Bay area solve burglary cases.

It goes far beyond fingerprints but can be just as accurate.  Analysts say it just takes a few days to get the results.

Pastor Mason Dorsey is one person this technology has helped.

Back in February, someone broke into Riviera United Methodist Church in St. Petersburg.  The person climbed through ceiling tiles to gain access to the church office.

Once inside, the person stole $70 and tried to pry open a filing cabinet with a screwdriver to access private financial information.  When that failed, the person left.

St. Petersburg Police came out, took a report and found a partial fingerprint on a ceiling tile.  

Since the fingerprint was left on a porous surface it proved worthless to investigators.

"I'm thinking there's not a lot of hope for this one," said Pastor Dorsey.

Detectives did take into evidence a screwdriver they believe the thief used to try and pry open the cabinet and submitted it for a new type of forensic testing called touch DNA.

It is not DNA that is visible like blood or saliva.  It is microscopic.

"Touch DNA is the transfer of cells from one item to another via touch," explained Janel Borries, DNA supervisor at the Pinellas County Forensic Laboratory.

Analysts like Borries scrape or swab surfaces to get enough skin cells to match to suspects.

"If you open a door or you touch somebody, all of those things could lend themselves to transfer of skin cells," Borries added.

Borries told ABC Action News all it takes are 30 skin cells.  That is not a lot considering scientists estimate humans shed one million skin cells a day.

"Typically, there are things will determine how much is put down or how many cells are put down, whether it be if the person is sweaty.  So that is a medium for transfer," Borries said.

Once skin cells are recovered from a scene or from an item, analysts use a process called polymerase chain reaction to make duplicates of the genes.

It is a very similar procedure to standard DNA testing.

During the second step in the lab, fluorescent compounds are mixed in that attach themselves to specific DNA locations, thus, giving a genetic profile of a person.

Typically, 13 DNA locations are specifically chosen because they are highly variable between people.

If a DNA profile is extracted, it is compared to a suspect's DNA or entered into an FBI database.

In the case of the church burglary, analysts say the profile from the screwdriver matched Scott Regan, 44.

But how accurate is the DNA match?  According to Borries, it is one in 330 million.

It was enough evidence for St. Petersburg Police to arrest Regan.

The touch DNA also linked him to four other church burglaries in the Bay area.

"He actually is the poster child for touch DNA," said Major Mike Kovacsev with the St. Petersburg Police Department.

Touch DNA has been around for nearly a decade but the forensic method has only been available at the Pinellas County Crime Lab for the past three years.

In that time, Kovacsev says the method has helped solve 38 percent of burglary cases.

Now, lab analysts say nearly 90 percent of cases that come through the crime lab have one piece of evidence collected in an attempt to obtain touch DNA.

"For us, its given us another tool to utilize and those cases prior to August 2010 would've never been solved," Kovacsev explained.

Detectives say thanks to this method a lot of crime victims have been given closure.

In Pastor Dorsey's case, it is giving him a day in court.

"To identify the person to us was a big relief and pretty impressive," Dorsey said.

Regan is still being held in the Pinellas County Jail.  He is awaiting trial and faces nine burglary counts.

As for touch DNA, detectives say they are now using it to help solve more violent crimes in the area like arson and murder.

http://www.chron.com/news/houston-texas/article/DNA-is-solving-property-crimes-3397341.php

A thief wearing gloves walks into a parking lot, perhaps using the cover of night, smashes a car window and takes what's inside the vehicle, all in a matter of minutes.

It's the general technique for many car burglaries, and thousands of them occur in Harris County every year. Besides shattered glass, often there's not much visible evidence left at the scene, leaving investigators with few clues to catch the culprits.

But sometimes it's what investigators cannot see that helps solve many of these types of crimes.

For the last few years, the Harris County Institute of Forensic Sciences aided area law enforcement in solving property crimes by testing evidence for "touch DNA" - microscopic skin cells containing DNA that naturally rub off when an object, like a car steering wheel, is touched. The technology can be used even if the suspect is wearing gloves because there's a high likelihood the skin cells were transferred onto the gloves when the perpetrator was slipping them on.

"It was a pretty incredible tool for us to have to identify some of these suspects," said Sgt. Terry Wilson, of the Harris County Sheriff's Office auto-theft division. "These (burglary of a motor vehicle) cases are some of the hardest cases for law enforcement to solve because there's almost never any eyewitnesses. There's very rarely any good evidence left behind, fingerprint evidence and things like that, and once we started recovering some of this DNA, it was pretty exciting there for a while."

DNA testing is a practice typically reserved for personal crimes like rape and murder. However, the forensic institute, formerly the medical examiner's office, has also been performing DNA testing on evidence - containing either skin cells or bodily fluids, like blood and saliva - from property crime cases such as car break-ins and home invasions.

Thousands of matches

Since January 2008, the forensic institute made more than 3,000 matches to crime suspects in the FBI's Combined DNA Index System database, or CODIS, a national database used to store DNA profiles. Of those, about 75 percent were for property crime cases.

Dr. Roger Kahn, director of the forensic genetics laboratory at the institute, said the crime lab is one of the few equipped to handle DNA testing for property crimes. The lab has no testing backlog on personal crime cases, so it can focus on property crimes, he said.

Kahn noted that when the forensic institute moves to its new expanded facility in the fall, the lab will have the capabilities to perform DNA testing in property crime cases for not only law enforcement agencies in the county, but the entire region.

Kahn believes it is a useful tool in solving many more crimes.

"These (property crime) cases by comparison are quite numerous in the community," he said. "They far outnumber the crimes against persons (murder and rape)."

Story of success

Wilson said the auto-theft division began collecting "touch" DNA evidence in the summer of 2010, in an effort to more aggressively target vehicle burglaries and thefts. He said they trained patrol deputies how to collect the evidence and asked them to test for every single car burglary and theft case they came across. They started seeing results almost immediately.

"On cases where we had absolutely zero to go on before, it definitely gave us a party to associate with the crime," Wilson said.

For example, Wilson said, around 3 p.m. Aug. 30, 2010, a man parked his Toyota minivan in a fast-food restaurant parking lot in the 10700 block of Veterans Memorial. After grabbing lunch, the man came back to find his van's window broken and his checkbook stolen.

Deputies collected evidence from the driver's door handle, door frame, glove box and steering wheel.

Test results showed that there was usable DNA in all samples collected, Wilson said. After the DNA was entered into CODIS, it identified 44-year-old Freddie Walker. He was convicted in 2011 and served 100 days in jail for the crime.
http://www.edition.cnn.com/2007/US/law/12/10/court.cold.cases/index.html

A computerized national database called CODIS that stores over a million DNA profiles of known felons can allow detectives to match their unidentified sample with a known criminal. This technology is particularly useful in cases of sexual assault.

Six-year-old Lisa Marie Bonham went missing while visiting relatives in Reno in 1977. Twenty-three years later detectives asked for her recovered clothing to be retested. Scientists found previously undetectable DNA evidence and matched it with that of Stephen Smith, a convicted felon.

Through CODIS, investigators can positively identify their suspect in as little as a few hours. The CODIS system can also help investigators more easily link a series of crimes to one person as was the case of the recent Long Beach rapist. In November, California police linked Mark Wayne Rathbun to 13 sexual assaults using DNA evidence that is so compelling even the suspect's mother believes he did it.

in the name of "justice" and "science" why should the tDNA found on Jonbenet be treated any different from these other cases in which the suspect was identified, prosecuted, and sent to prison, when their microscopic tDNA was found to match those found on clothing?

why does forumforjustice have one standard for the Ramseys, a lynch mob standard, but genuine scientists and prosecutors have a different one when they discover tDNA on clothing of murder and theft victims?

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